Genre Archives: Concerts

The Stone Foxes

For fans of Black Pistol Fire, Buffalo Killers, The Blackwater Fever

The Stone Foxes are San Francisco’s rock band.  They bear the torch of their predecessors with the knowledge that rock ‘n roll can move a new generation. They’ve played in front of thousands at festivals like Outside Lands and Voodoo Fest, they’ve headlined the legendary Fillmore Theater in their hometown and they have supported acts like The Black Keys, Cage the Elephant and ZZ Top.  Now, with the release of their fourth album, Twelve Spells, they have solidified a place in their City’s rich rock ‘n roll history.

Founded by brothers Shannon(vocals/drums/harp) and Spence Koehler(guitar/vocals), who came from the Sierra Nevada foothills near Tollhouse CA, The Stone Foxes started back in the Koehler’s SF State days in the Sunset District of San Francisco. Two weeks before they went on tour in 2011, they decided they needed a keyboard player and they added Elliott Peltzman from Fairfax CA to play for a couple months…but he never left. They needed another drummer who could also play bass and guitar for tour in 2013, so Shannon called his high school friend Brian “The Buffalo” Bakalian…he never left either.  Their old friend Vince Dewald came in to jam one day later on that year, and after the Indiana kid started singing, playing his lefty guitar, and his brother’s right handed bass upside down, it was a done deal.  Finally in 2014, after convincing(basically begging) Vince’s old bandmate to move back from his home town of Boston, Ben Andrews came out to play guitar and violin.  After their first practice with Ben, the circle was finally complete and they had beers at the Lone Star tavern on Harrison Street to celebrate their new found brotherhood.

The Stone Foxes are an experience to dive into, to get wild with, to sweat with.  “The Stone Foxes have an energetic style that’s rooted in swampy, foot-stomping rock…ambitious arrangements with diverse moods ranging from acoustic twang to thunderous electric-guitar riffs.”
– NPR/WXPN “WORLD CAFE”

Invoking the audience with their commanding stage presence, even jumping down into the crowd if the mood strikes. Their fans know they are in for something action packed and they light a fire in the band, just as the band spreads fire back into them. Guitarists digging in, lead vocals changing between two unique voices with impassioned nuance, and keyboard and organ sounds that fill the space with smoke and burning embers. There are crunchy drum tones, wailing harmonica draws and violin cries that can silence even the most raucous of rooms. But this is not a sit-down-and-watch kind of event. Like Elvis once said about rock n roll, “If you feel it, you can’t help but move to it.” The Stone Foxes’ live show brandishes this kind of dynamic passion on stage.  It’s impossible not to feel it.

With the release of Twelve Spells, the band has chronicled their new beginning.

“Garage rock gold…the sound of a band hitting their stride.”

– PANDORA

“Perfect back-to-basics rock”

– ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

The sounds they are creating are new with tinges of western darkness, punk, surf, and americana, but are strongly tied together by their everlasting rock ‘n roll core.  Lyrics about gentrification, income inequality, romance, and heart surgeries pour out of their stream of consciousness.  It’s a fresh rock ‘n roll album that chronicles the years of their unification, taking on the issues of their lives and our times.

“Driving this Weekend?  Listen to Twelve Spells by The Stone Foxes…Time will fucking fly.”
– DENIS LEARY

FUTURE PUNX

For fans of DIAT, Suburban Lawns, Merchandise

Pulling from the entire collective subconscious. Coming from a punk background. Taking a limitless approach. Future Punx are an open hearted exploration of the astral planes of punk, ever broadening an infinite palate.
Post Wave // Brooklyn, NY

Old 97’S

For fans of Son Volt, The Jayhawks, Drive-By Truckers, Jason Isbell, Ryan Adams 

“Rock and roll’s been very very good to me,” Rhett Miller sings on “Longer Than You’ve Been Alive,” an epic six-minute stream-of-consciousness meditation on his life in music. It’s a rare moment of pulling back the curtain, on both the excesses and tedium of the world of a touring musician, and it’s the perfect way to open the Old 97’s new album, ‘Most Messed Up.’

“I wrote that song very quickly and didn’t rewrite one word of it,” Miller explains.  “It’s sort of a thesis statement not just for this record, but for my life’s work.”

To say that rock and roll has been good to the Old 97’s (guitarist/vocalist Miller, bassist/vocalist Murry Hammond, guitarist Ken Bethea, and drummer Philip Peeples) would be an understatement. The band emerged from Dallas twenty years ago at the forefront of a musical movement blending rootsy, country-influenced songwriting with punk rock energy and delivery. The New York Times has described their major label debut, ‘Too Far To Care,’ as “a cornerstone of the ‘alternative country’ movement…[that] leaned more toward the Clash than the Carter Family.” They’ve released a slew of records since then, garnering praise from NPR and Billboard to SPIN and Rolling Stone, who hailed the band as “four Texans raised on the Beatles and Johnny Cash in equal measures, whose shiny melodies, and fatalistic character studies, do their forefathers proud.” The band performed on television from Letterman to Austin City Limits and had their music appear in countless film and TV soundtracks (they appeared as themselves in the Vince Vaughn/Jennifer Aniston movie ‘The Break Up’). Breaking Bad creator Vince Gilligan told The Hollywood Reporter that he put the band on a continuous loop on his iPod while writing the show’s final scene.

‘Most Messed Up’ finds the Old 97’s at their raucous, boozy best, all swagger and heart. Titles like “Wasted,” “Intervention,” “Wheels Off,” “Let’s Get Drunk And Get It On,” and “Most Messed Up” hint at the kind of narrators Miller likes to inhabit, men who possess an appetite for indulgence and won’t let a few bad decisions get in the way of a good story.

“A few people in my life said, ‘You can’t sing ‘Let’s get drunk and get it on,’” Miller remembers. “I said, ‘What do you mean? I’ve been singing that sentiment for 20 years! I was just never so straightforward about it.’”

It was a trip to Music City that inspired Miller to throw away his inhibitions as songwriter and cut right to the heart of things.

“For me, this record really started in Nashville on a co-write session with John McElroy,” he says. “I really admired his wheels off approach to songwriting, And I liked the idea he had for how he thought I should interact with my audience. He said, ‘I think your fans want you to walk up to the mic and say fuck.’ It was liberating.” It reminded me that I don’t have to be too serious or too sincere or heartfelt. I just have to have fun and be honest. I felt like I kind of had free reign to go ahead and write these songs that were bawdier and more adult-themed.”

The magic in Miller’s songwriting lies in the depth that he lends his characters. Upon closer inspection, the hard partying and endless pursuit of a good time often reveals itself to be a band-aid covering up deeper wounds and emotional scars.

“There’s a lot of darkness hidden in this record,” he explains. “One of the big Old 97’s tricks is when we write about something kind of dark and depressing, it works best when it’s a fun sounding song. So it’s not until the third or fourth listen that you realize the narrator of this song is a complete disaster.”

If that description calls to mind The Replacements, it’s no coincidence. Miller is a fan of the Minneapolis cult heroes, and now counts Tommy Stinson among his own friends and fans. Best known as bassist for the Mats and more recently Guns ‘n’ Roses, Stinson joined the Old 97’s in the studio in Austin, Texas, to lay down electric guitar on ## tracks, elevating the sense of reckless musical abandon to new heights and lending the album an air of the Rolling Stones’ double-guitar attack. It’s a collaboration Miller never would have even imagined in 1994 when the band released their debut.

“We didn’t think we’d last until the year 1997,” Miller laughs. “We thought the name would get a little weird when it became 1997, but we decided none of our bands had ever lasted that long, so let’s not even worry about it. But as it all started to unfold, we realized we could maybe make a living doing this, and we were all really conscious of wanting to be a career band. It was way more important to us to maintain a really high level of quality, at the expense, perhaps, of having hit singles or fitting in with the trends of the time, and I’m glad we did that.”

Twenty years on, it’s safe to say rock and roll has indeed been very, very good to the Old 97’s.

 

HIGHLY SUSPECT

Festival-storming trio Highly Suspect returned with second album The Boy Who Died Wolf on November 18th, 2016. The moving, jubilant LP from the Brooklyn alt-renegades follows two Top 10 Mainstream Rock hits (“Lydia,” “Bloodfeather”) and two Grammy nominations (Best Rock Song, Best Rock Album) just one year from the release of their 300 Entertainment debut, 2015’s Mister Asylum. For the follow-up, the band —  Johnny Stevens (guitar/vocals), and fraternal twin brother rhythm section Rich (bass/vocals) and Ryan Meyer (drums/vocals) — are reappearing stronger, livelier and more mature. The effort earned the boys a third Grammy nominated for “My Name Is Human” (Best Rock Song.)

“The title The Boy Who Died Wolf, it’s like, we were so young and now we’re adults,” says Stevens. “I went through a lot of issues that I had to sort out and sometimes I can’t believe that I’m alive. And now here I am traveling the world with my best friends, making music, and living the exact dream that we had set out to accomplish a long time ago … We’re learning a different lifestyle. And it’s good, it’s positive. But it’s also hard to let go of everything that happened in the past.”

That new lifestyle comes in the wake of success that’s snowballed since 2014, featuring Grammy nods; radio smashes; stops at major festivals (Lollapalooza, Bonnaroo, Reading and Leeds and so on); tours alongside Scott Weiland, Chevelle and Catfish & the Bottlemen to name a few; tours around the world including Australia, New Zealand, Europe and the UK as well as multiple headlining tours in the United States one of which is currently underway. The feeling of celebration infuses The Boy Who Died Wolf, while still heading into haunted regions of Steven’s past, yowling somewhere between the metronomic robot metal of Queens of the Stone Age, the bluesy wallop of Jack White and the feedback-shrieking noise-pop of In Utero-era Nirvana.

To record the LP, the band traveled far from their New York comfort zone to Bogotá, Colombia, recording with Mister Asylum producer Joel Hamilton (The Black Keys and Wu-tang, Tom Waits, Elvis Costello,).

“Normally we would record in New York or L.A., and when we’re in those places we just have too many distractions, too many friends,” says Stevens. “When you’re trying to make art.. pure art, it’s good to be secluded. So we were literally in a fortress, 20-foot walls all around this compound in the middle of Bogota.”

“The energy around you, the culture that you’re taking in, will affect the songs,” he continues. “We were really enjoying ourselves. So I think there’s a little more step to this album. There’s happier tones. There’s some dark stuff too but there are simply more uplifting moments on this album.  I think we finally realized we are supposed to be here making music. That people like what we do. We had more trust in ourselves and each other and just let the music come out.

The upbeat vibe begins to show its face lyrically in the lead single “My Name Is Human” (“I’m feeling the way that I’m feeling myself”), and then appears full force on the blazing desert-rock dynamite of “Postres” (“I’m havin’ fun for the rest of my days”), but takes a back seat in their dreamy cover of Real Life’s 1983 new wave swooner “Send Me an Angel” and on the anthemic “Little One” which reminds us all of the hopeless, lovelorn pangs that most have undoubtedly felt in the pit of their guts somewhere along the lines. But even the more serious songs are steeped in an unrelenting optimism. A great friend of theirs took his own life while the band were in Colombia, to which they responded with “For Billy,” a beaming post-grunge burst.

“The song is not a downer, it’s sad, but it’s a charged up anthem,” explains Stevens. “It’s what he would have wanted. It was a really sad moment but he was such a happy person. So that song is something he can blare through his Harley speakers wherever he is now .”

Johnny describes Billy as an “original crewmember” of MCID, the collective shouted out on Highly Suspect’s jackets, hats, lyrics and tattoos. “That’s our ethos,” says Johnny of the acronym that stands for “My Crew Is Dope.” “We’re trying to invite any and all positive people to what was once exclusively for us. We’ve realized its bigger than us; as long as you’re not a racist, not a homophobe and you have good intentions then we welcome you to join the family and spread the love.” In turn, Wolf’s “Viper Strike” namechecks MCID in a venomous, knives-out attack on bigots: “We’re all equal except for you/’Cause you’re an asshole with an ugly point of view”
“It’s a family of positivity that we’re really trying to build,” says Johnny. “Our whole purpose is not just about being some famous fuckin’ band, but kind of making a movement. Making a difference for our generation who are so constantly misled. We barely made it out of the wrong mentality. We want to help. We’re no fuckin hippies, those days are gone. The irony is that now you have to “fight” for positivity. Which is crazy but so be it. We’re strapped and ready to defend free thinking. When you come to our shows, it’s kind of like this family affair.”

Jessica Lea Mayfield

For fans of Sharon Van Etten, Hurray For The Riff Raff, Lady Lamb, Deer Tick, Avett Brothers 

Make My Head Sing…

Jessica Lea Mayfield has gained widespread acclaim for singing delicate confessions about love, heartbreak, and contradictory emotions in a way that captivates listeners and enchants critics. Whether she was heartbroken, or breaking hearts, Mayfield’s acoustic strumming and laid back demeanor have remained consistent since her earliest recordings.

However, on her third album, Make My Head Sing…, Jessica takes on distorted guitar tones, crashing drums, and heavy riffs that would more likely evoke a comparison to her idols of the early 90’s, than any modern day artist. The album was recorded at Club Roar in Nashville and was co-produced by Jessica, along with her husband Jesse Newport and features Matt Martin on drums. It finds Jessica in a place where she is ready to take control of her music, and elevate her reputation from folk songstress to rock star.

This is by far the heaviest, most rocking album you’ve ever made. Have you been holding back before this?

I would always kind of go more in that direction, and I’d have people encouraging me to go less in that direction. “You should do more of this and more of this” and I thought “okay, right?” My close friends and family hear the record and say it sounds the most like me that they’ve ever heard. And it feels like the first record that I’ve ever made.

You produced this one with your bassist, Jesse Newport, right?

Yeah, he’s my husband. We recorded it together in Nashville, and it took us nine months to record it and we had been referring to it as “our record baby.” It’s the first child that we’ve had together. I’m sure that, you know, we’ll have more babies and maybe real ones, but it’s been interesting getting to this place, meeting someone that’s a lot like me and getting to a point where we can sort of finish each other’s ideas. I’ve never had that kind of work relationship or romantic one where someone else knows what I’m thinking of.

Where did you first meet Jesse?

Jesse and I met at this festival in Iowa. He was one FOH for this other band that played there. The night that we met, we really hit it off. The tour that they were on, they were like one state behind us and we couldn’t catch back up the whole rest of the tour, and at the end, once their tour had ended, I had three days left and Jesse just came and met up with us and rode along the rest of the way And I hired him at the time to be my front of house, So we could date. And it worked so well that we pretty much immediately got married.

You worked with Dan Auerbach on your first two albums. What made you decide that it was time to take over the reigns on this one?

I feel like I’m at a point in my career where I know what I want, and all the things that I didn’t want or didn’t like, I’m capable of changing and making things more the way that I want. If you want something to be done the way you want it to, you’ve gotta do it yourself. I felt like I wasn’t going to make another record unless it was fun for me and special and it meant something.

On your earlier albums, you were tagged as a young folkie type. Did it take a while to get the courage to say “No, I want to be what I really am rather than what you want me to be”?

I was feeling some pressure to work on new stuff and make a new album, and I was really not wanting to move forward with the way things were. I was bored and I needed new ways to express myself, and I found that the best way to express myself is playing guitar. I think 24 was the year of deciding to be myself and what I’d love to do is to get out there and play guitar and have fun and hopefully get paid for it.

So it took nine months to make the album. Was it do a song, take a break, do another song, take a break?

We’d been down in Nashville in a studio called Club Roar. It was this big warehouse-y space and we’d go down there for about two weeks at a time and work on two or three songs, essentially just me and Jesse, once we’d wrapped our heads around it, we’d get the drummer, Matt Martin, to come over. The whole record is just me and Jesse and Matt. I think a lot of my favorite bands are guitar, bass, and drums. I wanted to simplify things. Bands are so big these days, I wanted to get in the studio and make a fuckin’ rock record and hear real guitar tones and something heavy. I almost only listen to music from the ’90s; I just don’t hear any music that…I just don’t hear it. It’s like everybody’s on some dubstep folk anthem thing or something. I don’t know.

So as far as the songs go, this is a heavier set of songs than you’ve done before. But there are other modes also. Like “Standing in the Sun” is probably the most straight-up poppy song you’ve ever done. Where did that come from?

You think so? That’s one that’s been around for a little while. I wasn’t sure how to record it, but I like where it landed. I would argue it’s one of the darker ones, in that it was written about me from a friend’s perspective, so it’s got this vibe of a friend telling me to go outside and be happy and don’t just shrivel up and die. I really do like so many different kinds of music that it all comes together in some form, but I really think this is the closest that I’ve gotten to coherently expressing what I like about music the most.

And the same time, “Party Drugs,” even though it comes back to the stripped-down, singer-songwriter sound, it seems so different from anything on your previous albums.

Yeah? “Party Drugs” is the song that inspired the whole record and the title of the record. It was the first one we recorded, and we recorded the guitar and the vocals here at the house. I was completely butt-ass naked, it was three in the morning and we were gonna go to bed, and I was like “We need to record this song right now” and it started the whole rabbit trail of me and the guitar. Actually I bought this baritone guitar (her name is Barry) at the Guitar Emporium in Louisville, Kentucky, and it’s this black glitter sparkle Gretsch, and that guitar is the reason I wrote this song, probably. It’s what got me into making another record and obsessed with playing… I found that guitar and it was $420, and I was like “This is a sign from Satan to buy this guitar” and I started playing guitar more.

 

Cameron Esposito & Rhea Butcher: Back To Back

Cameron Esposito is a Los Angeles-based standup comic, actor and writer.

In addition to her work as a nationally touring headliner, Cameron has appeared on NBC, CBS, Comedy Central, TBS, IFC, E!, Cartoon Network and HBO Canada. Cameron has appeared in films featured at the Sundance and SXSW Film Festivals.

Named a Comic to Watch by The New York Times, Variety, The Guardian, LA Weekly, Time Out Los Angeles, Jezebel, Los Angeles Magazine and Cosmopolitan Magazine, Cameron hosts her own standup show, Put Your Hands Together, every Tuesday night at the famed Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre in Los Angeles.

Cameron’s sophomore album, SAME SEX SYMBOL debuted at #1 on the iTunes comedy charts and was named a Best of 2014 comedy album by The AV Club, Consequence of Sound, Laugh Button and Paste Magazine. Cameron’s debut standup special MARRIAGE MATERIALwas released in 2016 and her first book is forthcoming from Hachette/Grand Central Publishing. Cameron is co-creator and co-star of TAKE MY WIFE, a television series which has gotten rave reviews from The New York Times, Vanity Fair, Vulture and Indiewire and is available now on Seeso.

 

ONE MORE TIME: A Tribute to Daft Punk

Our friends from Moguai Props will be in the house selling their custom-made robot helmets! PLUS you can get your photo snapped wearing one in our super Dafty photo booth! Be sure to arrive when the doors open at 8:00PM to check them out!

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One More Time: A Tribute to Daft Punk

One More Time: A Tribute to Daft Punk is the FIRST and ONLY realistic tribute of their kind! They don replica chromed helmets and costumes inspired by the 20th anniversary of the album Homework

One More Time flawlessly produce a high-octane DJ set combining Daft Punk anthems and original remixes.

Time machines are hard to come by…

 

 

Julien Baker

For fans of Frankie Cosmos, Big Thief, Lady Lamb, Whitney, Angel Olsen 

Sometimes, things just seem to happen for a reason. The pieces fall into place in unexpected ways, and life takes a turn no one could have predicted. This rings strikingly true for the solo career of Memphis, Tennessee’s Julien Baker.

For years, Baker and a group of close friends have performed as the band Forrister (formerly The Star Killers), but when college took her four hours away, her need to continue creating found an outlet through solo work. The intent was never to make these songs her main focus, yet the process proved to be startlingly cathartic. As each song came into shape, it became more apparent that Baker had genuinely deep, surprisingly dark stories to tell from her thus far short life (she turns 20 this fall). Tales of her experiences are staggering, and when set to her haunting guitar playing, the results are gut wrenching and heartfelt, relatable yet very personal. There’s something wonderfully hypnotizing about Baker gently confessing her soul with such tremendous honesty.

At the prompting of a friend, Baker ventured to Richmond, Virginia to record a number of her new songs at Spacebomb Studios. The tracks from this session were circulated among Baker’s friends, meeting high praise and lots of encouragement for the songs to see a proper release. Soon, she found a home on 6131 Records’ increasingly diverse roster, and plans were made to release her debut full length, ‘Sprained Ankle.’

To call ‘Sprained Ankle’ a happy accident would be misleading as to the nature of these poignant, emotive songs. Yet no one, least of all Baker, could have predicted she’d be releasing an album, especially as a solo artist. Thankfully, now the world will be able to share in her passion and sorrow.

 

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